1970s

Keypunch Card Girl

keypunch

Keypunch girls, like the one depicted here, translated code instructions onto punched cards which were then run by a card reader machine, such as the Crioe machine from this picture. This created a division of labor where men waited for their ideas to be “coded” and women were stuck in this low level job. Read more about the days of early women programmers here.

You can find this image as an artifact at the Computer History Museum, catalog number 102630584. For more information visit their website.

CDC Supercomputer Prototype

penciltop

The Control Data Corporation released this mockup for the CDC 8600 supercomputer in the 1970’s, however it never came to fruition and was canceled in 1974. We see here, once again, the woman being used as a prop rather than being actively engaged in the technology. Read more about women being used as props in computing ads here.

You can find this image as an artifact at the Computer History Museum, catalog number 1026227358. For more information visit their website.

Woman at Teletype Keyboard

teletype

This black and white image dated from 1970 was used to publicize the PDP-8/E minicomputer, advertised to fit in a small office. Here we see a woman as the user of the device, however note that in this time women were often regulated to more clerical code work. Read more about these computer girls here.

You can find this image as an artifact at the Computer History Museum, catalog number 102619005. For more information visit their website.

IBM Computer Girls

IBM

In this publicity photo for the IBM 370 Model 138 computer, there are two female students pictured along side three of their male counterparts. Photos like these are evidence of women in the computing workforce in the 1970’s growing as women grew from 15% of computer science majors to peak at 37% in 1983. Read more about this peak in the women in computing workforce here.

You can find this image as an artifact at the Computer History Museum, catalog number 102657017. For more information visit their website.

1978 Microcomputer Advertisement

1978Computer

This is an image of an advertisement run in 1978 for the Equinox 100 microcomputer from Parasitic Engineering. The woman pictured is used not to demonstrate her use of this technology, but rather as a marketing prop, showcasing the devices to men instead of being shown as the user of the technology. Read more about this trend here.

You can find more more information about this image and others at the Computer History Museum website.